Meet The Flock

The prefix to my flock name is 'Garn-clochdy' which is a stunningly beautiful and truly wild area of moorland, which is close to my heart and my home in the Cwmafon Valley between Pontypool and Blaenavon in South Wales. Although I am situated in Wales both of the rare breeds of sheep that I have chosen to keep originated in Scotland.

Hebridean Sheep

Hebridean Sheep, Garn-clochdy Flock, not for meat, vegetarian shepherd, South Walkes, Torfaen, Monmouthshire, Pontypool, South Wales

Since buying my first 2 ewes in 2010, my flock of Hebridean sheep have fluctuated in number between 2 and 30 animals. I don’t sell for meat so an outlet as been to sell to organisations such as the National Trust and local wildlife trusts to help with their conservation grazing projects. Some have gone for breeding and I am keen on the fine fleece produced by the breed. All my animals are registered pedigrees with the Hebridean Sheep Society.

Once a rare and endangered breed,  the Hebridean is now thriving, thanks to the many enthusiasts up and down the country with a passion for this ancient traditional breed which, in more recent history at least, originated in the western Isles of Scotland and is known by some as the St Kilda Sheep.

For more information on the breed check out the Hebridean Sheep Society web site.

Castlemilk Moorit Sheep

Castlemilk Moorit Sheep, Garn-clochdy Flock, not for meat, vegetarian shepherd, South Walkes, Torfaen, Monmouthshire, Pontypool, South Wales

I purchased my first four Castlemilk Moorits in September 2017. They are listed as endangered by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust and at present I have four breeding ewes that I hope to breed in the future. They get on well with the Hebrideans in the flock but have a character all of their own.

The Castlemilk Moorit was developed by Sir Jock Buchanan-Jardine in the early 1900’s from several primitive breeds; including Manx Loaghtan, Shetland and wild Mouflon. The name of the breed comes from the Castlemilk Estate in Scotland where they were originally bred and the lowland Scots word ‘moorit’ which refers to the light tan colour of the fleece.

Find out more about the breed on The Castlemilk Moorit Sheep Society website.